Customer journeys are not good enough, we need Customer context!

It’s a rainy day in Mumbai & my daughter is furiously multitasking to find fashionable rain coats. She is looking at customer reviews & social networking sites & is on Flipkart & Amazon too! All of them know she is from Mumbai, in some cases they have profile information from her registration data but none of them suggested she buy other stuff that she may need in the rains: Boots, umbrella!! Marketers need to understand the context in which consumers are & today there is enough data to give you insight on this. Retailers like Flipkart could have further used marketing campaigns across email, sms, in app, browser push to tell her more about expected weather in Mumbai over next 3 days & also providing her recommended brands to buy.

Consumers reach out to brands in many ways. India has 1.03 mobile connections & over 350 million internet users. Consumers connect with brands for a wide variety of reasons. Consumers want more information, improved service & better deals. And technology is making it easier for consumers to connect with brands. By 2020, the average person will have more conversations with bots than with their spouse, so says Gartner. They also say that “New audio-centric technologies, such as Apple’s AirPods, Google Home and Amazon’s Echo, are turning “voice first” interactions into ubiquitous experiences. By eliminating the need to use your hands and eyes for browsing, vocal interactions extend the web experience to multiple activities such as driving, cooking, waking, socializing, exercising, operating machinery.

context marketing

Today’s omnichannel customers will end up using the retailer’s touchpoints, in all permutations & combinations. Not only will they use smartphone apps to compare prices or download a coupon, but they will also be users of in-store digital tools such as an interactive catalog, a price-checker, or a tablet. Consumers will buy online and pick-up in store, or buy in the store and get their purchases shipped. Some research done by HBR has shown that customers who used 4+ channels spent 9% more in the store, on average, when compared to those who used just one channel.

Always connected customers can’t be pigeonholed into linear journeys. These consumers automatically turn to their phones in search of information, whether they’re at the gym, commuting to work, or shopping for groceries. Google refers to these spontaneous instances of discovery as micro-moments.

But even while consumers are finding increasing number of ways of reaching brands, companies struggle to provide them a seamless experience as they use these myriad channels.

This is further complicated by the emergence of communication channels that rely on proprietary standards — like Apple’s iAd, Android’s open architecture, and Facebook’s platform.

Each channel tends to be used by it’s distinct customer segments-like customers in the older demographics who are using i pads or multi device using millennials & so messages need to be customised to appropriate customer journeys.

Banking customers often struggle to engage seamlessly with banks. Citibank saw that an important concern of customers was to stop any charges on their card after it was lost or stolen, the company introduced Citi Quick Lock that allows users to quickly lock their card from a mobile app while they look for it.

None of this can happen unless companies start to change structure & processes keeping the customer at the heart of the thinking.Overseeing all of a firm’s interactions with customers is someone in the role of chief experience officer, a relatively new position in the C-suite. Chief digital officers are also starting to have this top-level responsibility. Marketers need a structure within their teams that brings the customer journey up front & centre & connects it with context!

As all of your products and services generate more and more data, the resulting context gives you the opportunity to disrupt your competitors. Also today consumers are allowing marketers to know their location. Since 2014, the number of Internet searches using a “find the nearest” term has doubled. Customers are also beginning to see the value of revealing their location in physical environments. The number of connected devices is growing by 15% to 20% per annum and will reach approximately 30 billion in 2020.Many devices, such as mobile phones, cars, and wearables, constantly monitor their user’s location, so the volume of inbound, spatially related data has never been greater. So the ability to further drive relevance by using location context is becoming real! Marketer’s need to be conscious to not overdo this & risk looking “creepy” to consumers!

McCormick developed FlavorPrint, an algorithm representing the company’s flavors as a vector of 50 data points. FlavorPrint helps consumers decode the flavors they already love, and invites them to discover, share and bring new flavors into their homes. FlavorPrint site has a simple promise: Tell it what you like, what ingredients you have, and what cooking equipment you have, and it recommends recipes. Those recommendations become finely tuned to your context as you continue to interact with the site. McCormick’s now partners with retailers and food suppliers, as well as social media networks and third-party services like Foodily, to create more relevant customer experiences.

Over the next few years or so, we’re likely to see a radical integration of the consumer experience across physical and virtual environments. Mckinsey research says that by 2016, the web will influence more than half of all retail transactions, representing a potential sales opportunity of almost $2 trillion. All this will drive marketers towards using “consumer context” in all of their marketing engagements. Many industries have a large opportunity in looking to align their Marketing with the context in which consumers discover, buy & experience their products & services.

Forrester calls this Context based marketing:

“For all the activity you try to catalyze through campaigns, individuals more commonly interact with your brand outside of those campaigns. They may learn about your product or service prior to purchase. Then they’ll use your product, connect with others, and even organize activities around it. They spread word of mouth, positive or negative — and that, whether you
like or not, is your actual brand image.The context of all those interactions determines whether they will engage and, more importantly, transact with your brand again. Marketing’s job now is to identify and use context to create a repeatable cycle of interactions, drive deeper engagement, and learn more about the customer in the process. The more marketers can internalize and act upon what they learn, the easier it is to make future interactions that much more engaging”.

Many businesses will create data led marketing advantage as they build competency in storing , interpreting & taking action on these vast terabytes of context data. Contextual marketing will yield a new form of “owned data” that is generated from the interaction cycle. Smartphone owners pick up or glance at their mobile phones 150 to 200 times each day, spending on average over two hours a day accessing apps and websites. This leaves a huge data trail behind as well.To get the full customer portrait rather than just a series of snapshots, companies need a central data mart that combines all the contacts a customer has with a brand: basic consumer data plus information about transactions, browsing history, and customer-service interactions.

But to do this CMO’s will have to take charge & demand a level of technology hitherto not seen in the Marketing department.And yes, 2017 is the year when Gartner predicted that CMO’s will spend more on IT , than CIO’s!!

The CMO’s guide to Technology & why Marketing Tech is different?

The chief marketing officer and the chief information officer have become the corporate board room’s odd couple.

According to Wall street Journal: “As marketing budgets shift to relatively newer channels like social media marketing and mobile advertising via complex advertising technology vendors, marketing executives have in recent years been tasked more and more with understanding technology — while technology executives have been pushed to understand marketing”.

But are Marketers really investing a lot in Technology. Two years back Gartner predicted that by 2017 CMO’s will spend more on IT than CIO’s. Is this happening? So how big is the market for marketing software today?

IDC has an answer to that question, $20.2 billion in 2014. IDC expects that the market will have a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 12.4% for the next five years, resulting in a $32.4 billion market by 2018.

 

IDC breaks that market down into four broad categories:

  • Interaction Systems — the majority of customer-facing marketing software advertising, digital commerce, marketing automation, web experience management, mobile apps, social media tools, etc.
  • Content Production and Management — internal authoring and publishing tools, CMS platforms, DAM platforms, etc.
  • Data and Analytics — storing data and producing insights from it, such as business intelligence, predictive analytics, financial analysis, and broader marketing analytics.
  • Management and Administration — internal communications tools, workflows, budgeting, expense tracking, MRM, project management, collaboration tools, etc.

And yet Marketers are finding it difficult to adopt technology. Success rates are not so high. Vendor hype is far higher than on the ground reality. Research shows that CMO’s need to be better prepared to overcome some of the challenges & one key impact item can be a stronger Technology organisation supporting the Marketing technology implementations.

 

Forrester polled 308 marketing and tech leaders, finding that 44% of marketers believe the CIO hires staff with marketing experience, an improvement compared with the 19% figure from last year’s survey. But on the other side, 58% of tech leaders think that marketers actually understand marketing technology, compared with 71% of marketers who believe so, a gap indicating how marketers’ “self-confidence is inflated,” according to Forrester.

And further research showed the CMO involvement in Technology still lags

 

So what should CMO’s do differently in 2017 that will prepare them for this Tech invasion of Marketing.

Action Items for CMOs

  • Meet the CIO & set a common Marketing Tech budget for 2017:
    Does your company have a Tech budget for Marketing. Forrester research shows that only 47% of marketers believe that the CMO and CIO at their company work together to develop a tech strategy prior to allocating a budget.
  • Marketing strategy should drive Tech purchase:
    think through what elements of your marketing strategy you are trying to impact: Are you trying  to scale up 1:1 marketing based on analytics ?Or is it critical to create a solid data infrastructure for all the disparate data that Marketing has access to? First crystallise the strategy.
  • Carefully consider what technology you want to buy:
    Remember there are 947 companies at last count selling Marketing tech to you. Don’t allow a bundled sale where someone selling an Enterprise stack just bundles in some marketing software for a very low cost. Think about the implications about a wrong choice.
  • Look at building your Marketing tech operation with one primary Marketing technology provider as a hub & a few secondary best of breed point solutions as a spoke.
    This will allow you to get a maximum level of baseline capability from one vendor & so reduce the complexity of managing multiple technology partners.
  • Think about what changes in the structure of your marketing team are you & your company ready to make:
    Are you ready to hire a Chief marketing technology officer & will he report to the CIO or the CMO? Think collaboration rather than team expansion. The IT team can be your best friend if you get the structure right. Marketers who can truly understand the intersection of marketing and technology are rare. Most marketing organizations still struggle to find qualified people to support the evaluation, purchase, implementation and use of these new marketing technologies
  • Be more Process centric:
    CMO’s are buying a lot of technology. The intent is that it will help make us better, smarter and more efficient marketers, but with every license comes a new login and new processes that must be implemented to encompass it in our day-to-day workflows. Technology loses its value if you don’t adapt your processes to take advantage of what the software brings to the table
  • Think ROI & partner the CFO from the start:
    manage expectations about how quickly magic will happen, because it won’t. Process change & skill adoption takes time. Account for it. Don’t get surprised.
  • The Growth Hacker:
    The growth hacker is someone or a small team of people who understands technology and probably even have some coding skills. They understand their organization’s digital landscape to discover potential opportunities or loopholes. So this unit creates a Big data plan & has the all round skills to quickly create pilots & show impact. Sometimes external partners with such strengths can become your Growth hacker partners

Unloved, undifferentiated & intrusive-is that a Bank?

Unloved, undifferentiated, and incapable of innovation — that’s what today’s  digitally savvy users, primarily including high-school students, entry-level  workers, and thirty-something professionals, believe about the banking industry says a recent survey of Millenials.

But often a bank’s marketing only reinforces this image. Pushing hundreds of irrelevant communications to customers despite having data about them frustrates customers.

And now consumers are begining to have choices.Nonbank solutions for financial services are not just imminent — they’re already here. Today’s digitally savvy retail banking customers are rapidly turning to Geezeo, Personal Capital, LearnVest, and others for personal financial management solutions. And they’re looking forward to other technology giants entering the market such as PayPal, Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google. Most of these new entrants are far more marketing savvy & have disrupted other industries by bringing the customer into the boardroom.

And yet, Banks often think of Customer centricity as a “fluffy” topic. Most bankers are hard wired left brain types & the retail banking business is such that customers are often prisoners & cannot leave very easily. According to Capgemini’s 2014 World Retail Banking Report (WRBR), less than 40% of customers globally reported positive customer experiences with their financial institution.

And yet there are contradictions: banks are probably amongst the few businesses that have an “extreme level of data” about customers. Banks know when you move your house, when you get that bonus & they even know when you are eating out at a restaurant or travelling internationally for the first time. Banking also was amongst the early adopters of analytics & so has the institutional capacity to understand customers better. And Banks have invested in huge amount of technology that can enable customer centricity. And yet Technology is transforming the way digitally savvy customers think about and manage their finances. And this is where banks may not be moving fast enough.

Banking tops the list of industries at risk of disintermediation by digitally savvy customers including millennials. And banks seem secure in the belief that this business is very hard to dislodge & too regulated to disrupt. Key findings from the Millennial Disruption Index (MDI), a three-year study of industry disruption at the hands of teens to thirty somethings (Millennials) found that 71% of Millenials would welcome a new bank from Amazon, Google, Square, Apple or Paypal.

I had written about the unbundling of banks earlier.

digital banks

In India, there seems to be a mad race by private sector banks to show Digital superiority. A lot of Apps are being launched. But at its core, the issue of being Customer centric still eludes many banks. Banks need to be committed to having an innate knowledge of their customer and using that knowledge for the customer’s benefit. Today most analytics teams in banks spend most of their effort in doing analytics that will benefit the bank: reduce risk, increase cross sell & reduce cost.

Chris Skinner, Chairman of the Financial Services Club and author of the book, Digital Bank, said, “A digital bank is a bank built with a vision to reach out to customers through digital augmentation. It is built specifically to offer the customer the service of their choice through the access of their choice.”

And yet banks do an extraordinary amount of push based marketing-pushing messages to customers which may not be relevant through emails, sms & calls. Banks set up campaign management teams that mine data & use marketing technology to automate campaigns for customers. But sometimes we need to be cautious about technology & automation. Our campaigns are not customer centric; they intrude & do not provide relevant information. In such a case, automating & increasing the volume of this campaign is pointless. You are only automating a more intrusive form of marketing, that doesnt work.

Often there is this belief that complex analytics is required to become more Customer centric by providing appropriate offers.But you don’t need too much fancy analytics to become more customer centric. There is so much data that exists with a bank that you can create hundreds of examples of campaigns that connect to customers.

I saw this wonderful example from Jim Bruene at Finovate:

“Card reissues after a data breach, or lost/stolen situation, are annoying for cardholders. But it’s even worse for the issuer who has to pay for a new card, hound the customer to activate it, handle customer service calls, and then risk losing recurring revenues from now-broken automated pre-authorized charges.

So kudos to Capital One for taking an important step in solving this problem.

Earlier this week I received a new card and number from Capital One, presumably because my card had been involved in a breach. I am not aware of any unauthorized attempts to use it.

In a followup email this morning, the giant issuer reminded me to activate the new card. That’s a fairly typical technique these days. But the help didn’t end there. The bank provided a list of likely merchants where I may need to update card info to avoid the charge being denied (see screenshot below)”.

http://bit.ly/1eOZroI

Simple communication like this can diffrentiate a bank & make it more relevant to consumers.

Here is what I believe banks need to think about:

  1. Treat customer communication with the same intensity that FMCG companies treat their advertising.
  2. Look at their data to “help customers”. Banks have rich information & everyone should be thinking about simple ways to connect with customers. Most times banks engage with customers only to cross or upsell. Bankers may want to think of a paradigm where sales begins to happen because you connect with customers at relevant moments with personalised communication like the example above.
  3. Set up a Customer Intelligence unit-use them to derive insight “about customers for customers”.
  4. Use that insight to create engagement programs with customers which help them lead their daily life.
  5. Cross sell will happen as an outcome.
  6. We believe that Marketing will move towards relevancy:
    • “Marketing that is done so well that it feels like a service”
    • “Marketing as a relationship”
  7. At Cequity we call this philosophy-“To service is to Sell”.